Posts Tagged lipid layer

Nature’s Tears® EyeMist®: New Discovery in Natural Products Marketing

Breakthrough Alternative for Consumers with Dry Eyes, Dry Eyelids and Computer Vision Syndrome

Dry eye, in the United States and worldwide, is becoming a crisis. Eighty-percent of eye doctor patients complain of dry eye symptoms such as itching, burning, blurred vision, red eyes, headache and fatigue. The importance of the eyelid in natural products marketing alternatives has only recently been recognized. Natural products researchers are discovering that if the tear film is dry, the eyelids will also be dry. This is especially true in chronic dry eye and in people who live in areas of extreme dry air or air pollution, or who spend a lot of time indoors.

The eyelid is critical in two areas of dry eye research:

  • Blink rate: Dry eye and tear film dehydration can result from a low rate of eyelid blinking. It may also result from an excessively high blink rate.
  • Eyelid health: The majority of dry eye patients have unhealthy and dry eyelids (blepharitis).

Blink rate. When using a computer, the eyelid’s blink rate, normally 15 to 20 blinks a minute, can slow to three blinks a minute. This is a primary cause of “computer vision syndrome” (CVS). A low blink rate increases exposure of the tear film to the air, increasing the amount of tear film water lost to evaporation.

Tear film evaporation and dehydration can also be worsened by a rapid blink rate. A normal tear film consists of a thin lipid (oil) layer that helps slow evaporation from the much thicker aqueous (water) layer underneath. Because blinking “wipes” the tear film and moves the layers, a rapid blink rate, like a low blink rate, can increase water evaporation and the potential for dehydration and dry eye.

Eyelid health. Researchers and individuals involved in natural products marketing, are discovering an enormous mutual influence between the tear film and eyelid health. Dry eye is frequently accompanied by blepharitis (eyelid inflammation), with red, inflamed, flaky, burning, itching and dry eyelids. When attempting to alleviate dry eye with an alternative all natural product, it is important to add supplemental water not only to the tear film but to the eyelids.

A new paradigm in eye moisture for natural products marketing. For those at high risk for dry eye, both the tear film and the eyelids can be kept hydrated with an all-natural, pure water eye mist supplement. Nature’s Tears EyeMist, from Bio-Logic Aqua Research, is a patented new alternative approach to natural products marketing for all-natural eye and eyelid hydration. The mist naturally supplements the tear film to soothe dry eye and dry eyelid – no matter how often you blink.

Nature’s Tears EyeMist contains 100% all-natural tissue culture grade water. The mist is applied in seconds and is non-allergenic; saline, chemical and preservative free. The product instantly hydrates dry eyes and dry eyelids to supplement tear film and eyelid moisture. Nature’s Tears EyeMist – a new paradigm that within a decade, will be found beside every computer.

Bio-Logic Aqua Research is continuing to investigate the relationship between dry eye, refractive eye surgery and tear film flooding from the application of formulated eye drops, al to develop alternative all-natural products.

To discover more about natural products marketing for dry eye, dry eyelid, blink rates and the tear film, see The Dry Eye Remedy by Robert Latkany, MD (Hatherleigh Press, 2007), or visit http://www.naturestears.com. For information about the Nature’s Tears EyeMist patent, go to https://biologicaqua.wordpress.com/2011/02/10/first-patent-on-water-eye-mist-for-dry-eye/

CONTACT:

Bio-Logic Aqua Research – Rogue Media Division. 5001 Lower River Road, Grants Pass, OR 97528; 1-800-FOR-MIST (367-6478); RogueMedia@biologicaquaresearch.com.

Websites

www.naturestears.com

whatistheeye.wordpress.com

www.biologicqua.com.

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Truck Driving and Vision Care

Quick and simple tips for truckers, equipment operators and other Professional drivers, to reduce fatigue and protect vision.

It’s more common than you might realize, and it can be deadly. You’ve been on the road for three days straight, with not enough sleep, and the air-conditioner and diesel exhaust blasting your face and eyes. After a while, your lips and face get chapped, your neck and shoulders feel stiff, and your eyelids become so heavy you have to stop and grab some coffee. Even then, your eyes may continue to feel tired and burning. Because you’re on a tight schedule, you press on even though your eyes continue to bother you and you know you’re becoming a road hazard. There often just isn’t time, on the road, to adequately protect your eyes.

As you are probably aware, there are several things drivers can do to prevent or relieve tired, strained, irritated “Trucker’s Eyes” on a long distance trip. You’ll be pleased to learn that not all of them involve coffee or eyedrops, either. Bio-Logic Aqua Technologies Biomedical Research has developed a wealth of new information about caring for eyes and skin – the result of a decade of research into dry air and eye moisture. Even if you don’t follow these recommendations to the letter, you never know when the information might come in handy. It might even prevent an accident.

The number-one villain: Dehydration

Much of the discomfort that truckers experience while driving comes from dehydration (drying out) of the eyes, skin (especially the facial skin), and breathing passages. Alleviate the dryness and many of the the symptoms go away!

Dry irritated eyes.

Several environmental factors in the typical truck cabin can combine to cause a slight increase in the rate of moisture (water) evaporation from the TEAR FILM covering the eyes’ exposed surfaces. The tear film is amazingly complex even though it is only about five microns (millionths of a meter) thick. It doesn’t take much evaporation to cause problems. The tear film consists of:

Lipid layer. This topmost layer is comprised of a very thin film of fatty oil that lubricates the eyelid and slows moisture evaporation from the lower layers.

Aqueous layer. The middle and thickest layer contains the vast majority of the tear film’s moisture. This is where most moisture loss occurs. The layer also contains electrolytes, proteins and bacteria-fighting antibodies. It provides oxygenated water to allow the cornea to breathe.

Mucin layer. This bottom layer glues the tear film to the optical surface. The most physically irritating result of tear film moisture loss is an over-concentration of electrolyte (salt) and proteins in the aqueous layer. The results are itching, burning, eye-strain, fatigue and other symptoms. Lack of adequate tear film moisture is called, “dry eye,” “dry irritated eyes,” or “trucker’s dry eye.”

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